The Great Gale of 1944

21 June 2017

“Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity”

This week in 1944, the PC 552 lost an anchor in the Great Gale of 1944 at Normandy. The ship was forced to run before the gale to survive. Ships were tossed around like matchsticks. What did you do this week?

The Germans knew the Allies required a major port so they placed their defenses around the ports. The Allies circumvented this by bringing Mulberries, portable ports. The Great Gale destroyed one Mulberry.

The navy quit listing the date and place of enlistment on the ship’s roster at some point. Because of this change, we lack this information for the following sailors who joined the ship in 1945:

Last Name First Name Serial Number
Blankenship Vernon (n) 9358706
Dolan John Joseph 8087644
Huling Paul T. 2762851
Kielty James Harold 2240816
Lindsay Richard (n) 2247365
Hicks Hinson Richard 8312119

This information can be found at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), I Archives Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63138. If you visit this facility, you may request this information. Please make sure to note this is for nonprofit historical research. Please help these sailors be remembered.

We need the date and place of enlistment for these men.

Please review the book at:

Amazon: https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble: https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

Createspace: https://goo.gl/x7ynXE

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/ggZRwS

 

You may contact me directly at: uss.pc.552@gmail.com

Air Attack!

14 June 2017

“Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity”

This week in 1944, the PC 552 suffered several air attacks, including a near miss at the stern. What did you do this week?

Most historians will say that the Nazi air cover on D-day was negligible and they are probably right.  I suppose when enemy fire is looked at from a strategic point of view, it can seem that way. However, from the point of view of the men of the PC 552, it seemed very up close and personal. A number of air attacks were noted in the ship’s documents, including a near miss.

Lt. (jg) Thomas Alexander Covert of Germantown, PA came aboard the ship 06 December 1942, two years before D-day. According to the ship’s muster rolls, he was the executive officer from that date to 31 July 1943.

However, we don’t know the date he was transferred from the ship and the rank he held when he transferred.

This information can be found at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), I Archives Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63138. If you visit this facility, you may request this information. Please make sure to note this is for nonprofit historical research. Please help these sailors be remembered.

We need the date and rank when Lt. (jg) Covert was transferred from the ship.

Please review the book at:

Amazon: https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble: https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

Createspace: https://goo.gl/x7ynXE

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/ggZRwS

You may contact me directly at: uss.pc.552@gmail.com

Lt. Donald McVickar

31 May 2017

Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity”

Lt. Donald McVickar was the first commanding officer of the PC 552. He boarded the ship on 29 July 1942 and was transferred 28 Nov 1942, just four months later. It is he who commanded the ship on its shakedown cruise and during its first attack on a suspected German U-boat.

I suspect he went on to command the destroyer escort USS Eisner (above) and attend Harvard after the war but I don’t really know. What I do know is that I was unable to find out what his rank was when he left the PC 552.

This information can be found at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), I Archives Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63138. If you visit this facility, you may request this information. Please make sure to note this is for nonprofit historical research. Please help these sailors be remembered.

We need his rank upon leaving the ship.

Please review the book at:

Amazon: https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble: https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

Createspace: https://goo.gl/x7ynXE

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/ggZRwS

 

You may contact me directly at: uss.pc.552@gmail.com

The People

24 May 2017

“Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity”

People 20170524The PC 552’s complement was four officers and 55 men but 196 men and 24 officers officially served on the PC-552 over its life. The activity of the men was listed on the Muster Roll of the Crew. A lot of work went into identifying all the men. We looked for information such as where they came from and when they entered the navy. All of these men have been enshrined in the book in Appendices A, B, and C.

We did not get complete information for 16 men and 3 officers. The information is at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) St. Louis, Missouri but I am afraid I exhausted their patience. If you request this information, please make sure to note this is for nonprofit historical research. You may have to visit NPRC. Please help these sailors be remembered.

One interesting person is Lt. K(arnig) Mooshian, who was the ship’s first Executive Officer. The name is Armenian yet here is a man who was integrated enough into the American culture in about 1910 to be an American navy officer. There is an interesting story here but I don’t know what it is. I hope some of you find out.

We need his hometown and rank upon leaving the ship.

Amazon: https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble: https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

Createspace: https://goo.gl/x7ynXE

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/ggZRwS

You may contact me directly at: uss.pc.552@gmail.com

The Officers and Crew of the USS PC 552 Want to Know What You Think of Their Story

17 May 2017Crew_of_the_USS_PC-552

“Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity”

A number of books have been bought and I thank you on behalf of the officers and crew of the PC 552.  Tell us what you think about their story. So far, the most appreciated chapter has been the chapter of the personal experiences of D-day. Some readers said it gave chills up their spines.

Another dominant point was that many today don’t know about D-day and its significance. They would appreciate a chapter before the D-day chapter which explains the reasons for D-day, the battle plan, and where the PC 552 fit into all of this.

Perhaps in a year or two, I will write another expanded version incorporating the suggestions I receive but no promises. This has cost a lot of money and has been a lot of work. Of course, it will be partly a function of how well this book is appreciated.

In the meantime, the crew and I would like your reviews. You may give customer reviews at the following links:

Amazon: https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble: https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

Createspace: https://goo.gl/x7ynXE

Goodreads: https://goo.gl/ggZRwS

You may contact me directly at: uss.pc.552@gmail.com

The World War II Roundtable

10 May 2017

Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity”Speaker

I was requested to speak about the USS PC 552 at the World War II Roundtable. The discussion covered the ship and its crew as well as expanded on how the navy in general was deployed.

The room was packed and the audience was appreciative. I was not looking for this but I enjoyed sharing the story.

Amazon:   https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble:   https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

The American Legion Supports the Book

03 May 2017Legiontown

“Normandy: A Father’s Ship and a Son’s Curiosity” available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

We all know the American Legion. The legion does good work. The Legion is now promoting the book and the link to the Legion’s site is: 

http://www.legiontown.org/ownwords/4057/normandy-fathers-ship-and-sons-curiosity

Thank you, brothers!

You may purchase the book by clicking at:

Amazon:

https://goo.gl/sIwaQO

Barnes and Noble:

https://goo.gl/yyaJTD

The End of the PC 552

17 April 2017The End of the PC 552

Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship, a Son’s Curiosity” coming out 2017 

This week in 1946, the PC 552 was decommissioned. What did you do this week?

18 April 1946 the PC 552 was moored for the last time as a US Navy vessel. It was formally decommissioned at 1705 by Lt. (jg) R.E. GLEASON, USNR, Commanding Officer, who placed the ship out of commission in accordance with Com 6 letter of 18 Apr 1946: Serial PC/A4-1/NB.

The PC 552 had been built and crewed in haste in July 1942 and was at the Battle of Normandy on D-day. It faced fire and shell and returned the same. It had other encounters after D-day. The war was now over and the ship served no purpose. It was turned over to the maritime commission December 1946 for disposal and no one knows its final fate to this day. It was probably ignobly cut up as scrap.

This week in 1946, we see the end of the PC 552 as a US Navy vessel.

Please review the first chapter at: https://www.facebook.com/pg/PC552/reviews/

Roosevelt Dies

12 April 2017

Companion book: “Normandy: A Father’s Ship, a Son’s Curiosity” coming out April 2017

On 12 April 1945, President RoosevRoosevelt Dies.JPGelt died. To most of America’s young fighting men, he had been president most of their lives. He was the only president during the entire war effort and he had guided them through most of the Great Depression. He was a symbol of strength and hope.

The PC 552 received a letter dated 13 April 1945 from the Navy Secretary directing the ship to fly its flag at half-mast. The ship also observed the death of the president by dropping two depth charges on known wreck at 1920 B ( the navy designates time zones by letter; “B” is the British time zone)  in position 49°45’40″N 01°44’00″W” which was dutifully noted in the deck log

This week in 1945, we leave the crew mourning the loss of their commander in chief.